1. Transhumanity Blog

    There are currently no articles.

    1. See all Oh, the Transhumanity! articles
  2. Hints of the Singularity

    1. Strangely Shaped Oceans of Red-Dwarf Planets

      Strangely Shaped Oceans of Red-Dwarf Planets

      Alien planets circling red dwarf stars, the most common in the universe, may often have strange lobster-shaped oceans on their surfaces, researchers in China now say. These findings suggest the habitable zones where life as we know it might dwell around these stars is smaller than previously thought.

      The most common type of star in the universe is the red dwarf. These stars, also known as M dwarfs, are small and faint, about one-fifth as massive as the sun and up to 50 times dimmer.

       

       

      Read Full Article
    2. See all articles
  3. Exponential Progression

    1. Scientists build thinnest-possible LEDs to be stronger, more energy efficient

      Scientists build thinnest-possible LEDs to be stronger, more energy efficient

      (Phys.org) —Most modern electronics, from flat-screen TVs and smartphones to wearable technologies and computer monitors, use tiny light-emitting diodes, or LEDs. These LEDs are based off of semiconductors that emit light with the movement of electrons. As devices get smaller and faster, there is more demand for such semiconductors that are tinier, stronger and more energy efficient.

      Read Full Article
    2. Engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA

      Engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA

      A team led by the University of Washington has developed a programming language for chemistry that it hopes will streamline efforts to design a network that can guide the behavior of chemical-reaction mixtures in the same way that embedded electronic controllers guide cars, robots and other devices.

      Read Full Article
    3. New electron beam writer enables next-gen biomedical and information technologies

      New electron beam writer enables next-gen biomedical and information technologies

      The new electron beam writer housed in the Nano3 cleanroom facility at the Qualcomm Institute is important for electrical engineering professor Shadi Dayeh's two major areas of research. He is developing next-generation, nanoscale transistors for integrated electronics; and he is developing neural probes that have the capacity to extract electrical signals from individual brain cells.

      Read Full Article
    4. IBM Research creates new foundation to program SyNAPSE chips

      IBM Research creates new foundation to program SyNAPSE chips

      Scientists from IBM unveiled on Aug. 8 a breakthrough software ecosystem designed for programming silicon chips that have an architecture inspired by the function, low power, and compact volume of the brain.  The technology could enable a new generation of intelligent sensor networks that mimic the brain’s abilities for perception, action, and cognition.

      Read Full Article
    5. See all articles
  4. Challenges

    1. Terahertz detectors using carbon nanotubes may lead to major imaging improvements

      Terahertz detectors using carbon nanotubes may lead to major imaging improvements

      This illustration shows an array of parallel carbon nanotubes 300 micrometers long. Attached to electrodes, they show unique qualities as a photodetector (credit: Francois Leonard, Sandia National Laboratories)

      Researchers at three institutions have teamed up to develop new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection, and other applications.

      Read Full Article
    2. Amazon Working on Unmanned Drones to Deliver Packages

      Amazon Working on Unmanned Drones to Deliver Packages

      Amazon is working on an ambitious plan to deploy a fleet of unmanned flying octocopters to deliver your Amazon Prime orders to you within an hour of your purchase.  While the FAA regulations barely exist to cover this, Amazon is pressing forward and expects these robots to be operational within the next few years.

      Read Full Article
    3. See all articles
  5. Echos of the Past

    1. Breakthrough in sensing at the nanoscale

      Breakthrough in sensing at the nanoscale

      Researchers have made a breakthrough discovery in identifying the world's most sensitive nanoparticle and measuring it from a distance using light. These super-bright, photostable and background-free nanocrystals enable a new approach to highly advanced sensing technologies using optical fibres.

      Read Full Article
    2. Amoeba-inspired Self-Organizing Systems

      Researchers Shlomi Dolev, Robert Gmyr, Christian Scheideler, and Andréa W. Richa describe a new model of biologically-inspired nanorobots in a new paper, "Ameba-inspired Self-organizing Particle Systems".  From their abstract:

      Self-organizing particle systems have many interesting applications like coating objects for monitoring and repair purposes and the formation of nano-scale devices for surgery and molecular-scale electronic structures. While there has been quite a lot of systems work in this area, especially in the context of modular self-reconfigurable robotic systems, only very little theoretical work has been done in this area so far. We attempt to bridge this gap by proposing a model inspired by the behavior of ameba that allows rigorous algorithmic research on self-organizing particle systems.

      Read Full Article
    3. See all articles
  6. Recent Articles

  1. Categories

    1. Exponential:

      Hardware, Mindware, Software, Wetware
    2. The Singularity:

      Extreme Lifespans, Humachines, Interstellar Expansion, Uploading
    3. Challenges:

      Energy Crisis, Environmental Collapse, Feeding the Masses, Pessimism
    4. Echos of the Past:

      Civilization, Evolution
  2. Projects in the News

    There are no recent projects in the news.

  3. People in the News

    There are no recent people in the news.

  4. Organizations in the News

    There are no recent organizations in the news.

  5. Quotes

    1. The photonic energy in the terahertz range is much smaller than for visible light, and we simply don't have a lot of materials to absorb that light efficiently and convert it into an electronic signal.
      By François Léonard
    2. Carbon nanotube thin films are extremely good absorbers of electromagnetic light.
      By François Léonard
    3. It is, all around, I think, really a big leap in technology. It really takes things to the next level.
      By Elon Musk
    4. The reason that this is really important is that, apart from the convenience of the landing location, is that it enables rapid reusability of the spacecraft.
      By Elon Musk
    5. I think 20 years for thousands of flights.
      By Elon Musk
  6. The Singularity In Pictures

    Will super-human artificial intelligence (AI) be subject to evolution? Transhumanism, Technology, and Science: To Say It’s Impossible is to Mock History Itself Elon Musk Teases the Hyperloop Mining the heavens: In conversation with Planetary Resources' Chief Engineer The Next 50 Years: Why I'm Optimistic Because Everything Will Be Terrible NASA to launch asteroid-grabbing spacecraft in 2019 Terahertz detectors using carbon nanotubes may lead to major imaging improvements SpaceX Aims for Mars with Reusable Rockets, Spaceships Human space program review recommends US focus on Mars Researchers speculate on computers of the future Strangely Shaped Oceans of Red-Dwarf Planets Scientists build thinnest-possible LEDs to be stronger, more energy efficient
  7. About the Editor

    Chris Guidry
    Chris Guidry

    Chris Guidry is a software engineer, futurist, and proud father of 4 children in the first generation to live forever.

    Full profile